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Allergy relief: nothing to sniff at

Published On: Oct 10 2011 02:27:49 PM CDT
Updated On: Jul 06 2011 08:15:06 AM CDT
boy sneezing

(NewsUSA) - Do you have difficulty controlling your allergy symptoms even though you're on medications? Or do you still get allergy-like symptoms even when the allergy season is over? If so, you may be one of over 40 million people who suffer from a condition called nonallergic rhinitis.

Easily confused with seasonal allergies, nonallergic rhinitis causes similar symptoms such as congestion, runny nose, sinus pressure and pain. But unlike allergies, it's not caused by allergens such as pollen and ragweed. Instead, it's often caused by environmental factors such as perfumes, household cleaners, cigarette smoke or changes in weather.

Even if you've been diagnosed with seasonal allergies, there's a good chance you also have a non-allergic component to your suffering. A recent study confirmed that 50 to 70 percent of allergy sufferers also have nonallergic rhinitis.

If you think that you might have nonallergic causes for your symptoms, ask your doctor. Unfortunately, allergy pills like Claritin, Zyrtec and Allegra do little to relieve nonallergic rhinitis. Instead, your doctor may recommend a prescription nasal steroid or a new over-the-counter nasal spray called Sinus Buster, which has been clinically proven to provide significant relief for sufferers who have both allergic and nonallergic causes for their symptoms. Sinus Buster contains capsaicin -- one of the most studied botanical medicines -- and has been shown to directly shut down the receptors in the nose that cause congestion, sinus pressure and pain. Sinus Buster has demonstrated a very fast onset of action, with patients experiencing relief in under one minute. Most importantly, all-natural Sinus Buster has an excellent safety profile with no rebound congestion, a habit-forming condition associated with chemical-based sprays such as Afrin.

The Sinus Buster study was fielded by allergy specialist Dr. Jonathan Bernstein, professor of medicine in the Division of Immunology/Allergy at the University of Cincinnati's College of Medicine. He has published several papers on the importance of proper diagnosis of nonallergic rhinitis and has successfully treated many of his own patients with Sinus Buster.

To learn more about nonallergic rhinitis or the Sinus Buster clinical, visit www.BusterBrands.com.