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Gov. McCrory declares State of Emergency as winter storm moves across N.C.

By WCTI Staff
Published On: Jan 28 2014 02:45:57 PM CST
Updated On: Jan 28 2014 02:48:58 PM CST
McCrory Speech
NORTH CAROLINA -

Gov. Pat McCrory has issued a State of Emergency for North Carolina in response to the winter storm.

Executed under the Emergency Management Act, the State of Emergency declaration allows the governor to mobilize the necessary resources to respond to a storm.

It is also the first step in seeking federal funds to help pay the cost of providing emergency services, clearing debris and repairing any damaged public infrastructure.

Gov. McCrory issued the following statement Tuesday afternoon:

"Given the forecast and as winter weather approaches, we are working with all necessary departments and local emergency management crews in order to keep our citizens safe and up to date regarding potentially hazardous weather conditions.

"[Tuesday] morning, I signed two executive orders declaring a State of Emergency for North Carolina and waiving certain requirements for vehicles assisting in relief efforts. We are prepared for likely power outages and dangerous driving conditions throughout our state. These executive orders and our capable statewide and local officials will ensure a rapid response to any adverse conditions."

The executive order also waives restrictions on weight and the hours of service for fuel, utility and other truck drivers that may be working to deliver supplies, restore services or clear debris in response to the winter storm, according to a news release from the Governor's Office. The waiver is in effect for 30 days.

Governor McCrory said state agencies have been partnering with local emergency management officials. Storm preparations include transportation crews treating the roads with salt and brine. In addition, Highway Patrol troopers and N.C. National Guard soldiers are on standby, McCrory said.